Gravitational trapping of carbon dioxide in deep sea sediments: Permeability, buoyancy, and geomechanical analysis

J. S. Levine, J. M. Matter, D. Goldberg, A. Cook, Klaus Lackner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Liquid carbon dioxide injected in deep-sea sediments at km depths and near freezing temperatures is denser than surrounding pore water and will be trapped by gravitational forces. Storage capacity for CO2 in such formations below the ocean floor is shown to vary with seafloor depth, geothermal gradient, porosity, and pore water salinity. The formation permeability, or the successful engineering of such permeability through hydraulic fracturing, will determine the capacity for gravitational trapping in deep-sea geological formations. We conclude that most ocean sediments at appropriate depth will lack the required permeability and that conventional hydraulic fracturing would only be possible in carefully selected sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberL24703
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume34
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 28 2007
Externally publishedYes

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deep-sea sediment
buoyancy
trapping
carbon dioxide
permeability
sediments
fracturing
porosity
hydraulics
porewater
oceans
seafloor
geothermal gradient
salinity
freezing
water
deep sea
engineering
gradients
liquid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Gravitational trapping of carbon dioxide in deep sea sediments : Permeability, buoyancy, and geomechanical analysis. / Levine, J. S.; Matter, J. M.; Goldberg, D.; Cook, A.; Lackner, Klaus.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 34, No. 24, L24703, 28.12.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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