Graph decompositions with application to wavelength add-drop multiplexing for minimizing SONET ADMs

Charles Colbourn, Alan C H Ling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a synchronous optical network ring, assignment of source-to-destination circuits to wavelengths must respect traffic requirements and minimize both the number of wavelengths and the amount of terminal conversion equipment. When traffic requirements are approximately equal on all source-destination circuits, the assignment can be modeled as a graph decomposition problem. In this setting, techniques from combinatorial design theory can be applied. These techniques are introduced in a simpler form when every source-destination circuit requires one quarter of a wavelength. More sophisticated design-theoretic methods are then developed to produce the required decompositions for all sufficiently large ring sizes, when each source-destination circuit requires one eighth of a wavelength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-156
Number of pages16
JournalDiscrete Mathematics
Volume261
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 28 2003

Fingerprint

Delta modulation
Graph Decomposition
Multiplexing
Wavelength
Decomposition
Networks (circuits)
Assignment
Traffic
Combinatorial Design
Ring
Approximately equal
Requirements
Optical Networks
Fiber optic networks
Minimise
Decompose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Discrete Mathematics and Combinatorics
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Graph decompositions with application to wavelength add-drop multiplexing for minimizing SONET ADMs. / Colbourn, Charles; Ling, Alan C H.

In: Discrete Mathematics, Vol. 261, No. 1-3, 28.01.2003, p. 141-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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