Grandstanding, certification and the underpricing of venture capital backed IPOs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

278 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine the role of venture capital backing in the underpricing of IPOs. Controlling for endogeneity in the receipt of venture funding, we find that venture capital backed IPOs experience larger first-day returns than comparable non-venture backed IPOs. Between 1980 and 2000, the average return difference ranges from 5.01 percentage points to 10.32 percentage points. This return difference is particularly pronounced in the "bubble" period of 1999-2000. Consistent with the grandstanding hypothesis proposed by Gompers (J. Financial Econ. 42 (1996) 133), we find that higher underpricing leads to larger future flows of capital into venture capital funds, particularly after 1996. Cross-sectionally, the effect of underpricing is attenuated for younger venture capital firms and those that have previously conducted fewer IPOs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-407
Number of pages33
JournalJournal of Financial Economics
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Underpricing
Certification
Venture capital
Funding
Endogeneity
Bubble
Venture
Venture capital firms

Keywords

  • IPOs
  • Venture Capital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Accounting
  • Strategy and Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Finance

Cite this

Grandstanding, certification and the underpricing of venture capital backed IPOs. / Lee, Peggy; Wahal, Sunil.

In: Journal of Financial Economics, Vol. 73, No. 2, 08.2004, p. 375-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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