God, schools, and government funding: First amendment conundrums

Laurence H. Winer, Nina J. Crimm

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In recent years, a conservative majority of the U.S. Supreme Court, over vigorous dissents, has developed circumventions to the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment that allow state legislatures unabashedly to use public tax dollars increasingly to aid private elementary and secondary education. This expansive and innovative legislation provides considerable governmental funds to support parochial schools and other religiously-affiliated education providers. That political response to the perceived declining quality of traditional public schools and the vigorous school choice movement for alternative educational opportunities provokes passionate constitutional controversy. Yet, the Court’s recent decision in Arizona Christian School Tuition Organization v. Winn inappropriately denies taxpayers recourse to challenge these proliferating tax funding schemes in federal courts. Professors Winer and Crimm clearly elucidate the complex and controversial policy, legal, and constitutional issues involved in using tax expenditures - mechanisms such as exclusions, deductions, and credits that economically function as government subsidies - to finance private, religious schooling. The authors argue that legislatures must take great care in structuring such programs and set forth various proposals to ameliorate the highly troubling dissention and divisiveness generated by state aid for religious education.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    PublisherAshgate Publishing Ltd
    Number of pages281
    ISBN (Print)9781409450320, 9781409450313
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

    Fingerprint

    taxes
    amendment
    god
    funding
    school
    legal policy
    government subsidies
    elementary education
    school choice
    deduction
    religious education
    educational opportunity
    recourse
    court decision
    secondary education
    dollar
    Supreme Court
    credit
    finance
    expenditures

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences(all)
    • Arts and Humanities(all)

    Cite this

    Winer, L. H., & Crimm, N. J. (2015). God, schools, and government funding: First amendment conundrums. Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

    God, schools, and government funding : First amendment conundrums. / Winer, Laurence H.; Crimm, Nina J.

    Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2015. 281 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Winer, LH & Crimm, NJ 2015, God, schools, and government funding: First amendment conundrums. Ashgate Publishing Ltd.
    Winer LH, Crimm NJ. God, schools, and government funding: First amendment conundrums. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2015. 281 p.
    Winer, Laurence H. ; Crimm, Nina J. / God, schools, and government funding : First amendment conundrums. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2015. 281 p.
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