Global spectral classification of Martian low-albedo regions with Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data

A. Deanne Rogers, Joshua L. Bandfield, Philip Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Martian low-albedo surfaces (defined here as surfaces with Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) albedo values ≤0.15) were reexamined for regional variations in spectral response. Low-albedo regions exhibit spatially coherent variations in spectral character, which in this work are grouped into 11 representative spectral shapes. The use of these spectral shapes in modeling global surface emissivity results in refined distributions of previously determined global spectral unit types (Surface Types 1 and 2). Pure Type 2 surfaces are less extensive than previously thought, and are mostly confined to the northern lowlands. Regional-scale spectral variations are present within areas previously mapped as Surface Type 1 or as a mixture of the two surface types, suggesting variations in mineral abundance among basaltic units. For example, Syrtis Major, which was the Surface Type 1 type locality, is spectrally distinct from terrains that were also previously mapped as Type 1. A spectral difference also exists between southern and northern Acidalia Planitia, which may be due in part to a small amount of dust cover in southern Acidalia. Groups of these spectral shapes can be averaged to produce spectra that are similar to Surface Types 1 and 2, indicating that the originally derived surface types are representative of the average of all low-albedo regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE02004
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research E: Planets
Volume112
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2007

Fingerprint

Mars Global Surveyor
thermal emission
albedo
Spectrometers
Mars
spectrometer
spectrometers
Hot Temperature
type locality
emissivity
spectral sensitivity
Minerals
Dust
dust
minerals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Global spectral classification of Martian low-albedo regions with Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data. / Rogers, A. Deanne; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, Vol. 112, No. 2, E02004, 20.02.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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