Global climate change and optimal forest management

Jeffrey Englin, J. M. Callaway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A policy question of current interest is how to cope with climate change. One suggestion is to use forests to offset carbon emissions, and therefore, reduce the threat of global warming. This study develops a rigorous model of the relationship between optimal forest harvesting regimes and carbon sequestration. The theoretical analysis integrates the carbon sequestration life cycle into the Faustmann framework and develops optimal cutting rules when carbon sequestration benefits are considered. The carbon life cycle includes both the sequestration of carbon and its ultimate re-release into the atmosphere. A case study of Douglas fir applies the theoretical framework. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-202
Number of pages12
JournalNatural Resource Modeling
Volume7
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Forest Management
Forestry
Climate Change
Climate change
carbon sequestration
forest management
global climate
Carbon
climate change
life cycle
carbon
carbon emission
Life Cycle
Life cycle
global warming
Global Warming
atmosphere
Harvesting
Global warming
Atmosphere

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Global climate change and optimal forest management. / Englin, Jeffrey; Callaway, J. M.

In: Natural Resource Modeling, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1993, p. 191-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Englin, Jeffrey ; Callaway, J. M. / Global climate change and optimal forest management. In: Natural Resource Modeling. 1993 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 191-202.
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