Glass-forming microemulsions: Vitrification of simple liquids and electron microscope probing of droplet-packing modes

J. Dubochet, M. Adrian, J. Teixeira, C. M. Alba, R. K. Kadiyala, D. R. MacFarlane, Charles Angell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent development of microemulsion systems which do not separate during cooling and in which neither dispersed nor matrix phases crystallize during the cooling process permits low-temperature studies of the microemulsion structure and the investigations of common liquids in unusual states. Benzene, carbon tetrachloride, and CS2 all can be supercooled without limit in microemulsion form, and their glass transition temperatures have been determined. Transmission electron microscopy of thin vitrified layers permits high-resolution observations of water-diluted samples of the same microemulsions. Gas-like, liquid-like and solid-like (hexagonal) organization of the microemulsion droplets are observed. Other experiments must decide which of these structures are imposed by the thin-film preparation technique and which are natural arrangements of warm bulk microemulsions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6727-6732
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry
Volume88
Issue number26
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

vitrification
Vitrification
Microemulsions
Electron microscopes
electron microscopes
microscopes
cooling
Glass
glass
carbon tetrachloride
Liquids
liquids
glass transition temperature
benzene
preparation
transmission electron microscopy
high resolution
matrices
thin films
gases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Dubochet, J., Adrian, M., Teixeira, J., Alba, C. M., Kadiyala, R. K., MacFarlane, D. R., & Angell, C. (1984). Glass-forming microemulsions: Vitrification of simple liquids and electron microscope probing of droplet-packing modes. Journal of Physical Chemistry, 88(26), 6727-6732.

Glass-forming microemulsions : Vitrification of simple liquids and electron microscope probing of droplet-packing modes. / Dubochet, J.; Adrian, M.; Teixeira, J.; Alba, C. M.; Kadiyala, R. K.; MacFarlane, D. R.; Angell, Charles.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 88, No. 26, 1984, p. 6727-6732.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dubochet, J, Adrian, M, Teixeira, J, Alba, CM, Kadiyala, RK, MacFarlane, DR & Angell, C 1984, 'Glass-forming microemulsions: Vitrification of simple liquids and electron microscope probing of droplet-packing modes', Journal of Physical Chemistry, vol. 88, no. 26, pp. 6727-6732.
Dubochet J, Adrian M, Teixeira J, Alba CM, Kadiyala RK, MacFarlane DR et al. Glass-forming microemulsions: Vitrification of simple liquids and electron microscope probing of droplet-packing modes. Journal of Physical Chemistry. 1984;88(26):6727-6732.
Dubochet, J. ; Adrian, M. ; Teixeira, J. ; Alba, C. M. ; Kadiyala, R. K. ; MacFarlane, D. R. ; Angell, Charles. / Glass-forming microemulsions : Vitrification of simple liquids and electron microscope probing of droplet-packing modes. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry. 1984 ; Vol. 88, No. 26. pp. 6727-6732.
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