Glare susceptibility test results correlate with temporal safety margin when executing turns across approaching vehicles in simulated low-sun conditions

Robert Gray, David Regan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the results of a laboratory glare susceptibility test with the execution of turns at an intersection (turns that required the driver to cross a lane containing approaching traffic). We measured glare susceptibility by means of low and high-contrast letter charts with and without a glare source. Driving performance in the absence and presence of simulated low sun was assessed using a simulator. In particular, we measured the difference between the time taken to complete a turn across the path of an approaching vehicle and the time to collision (TTC) with the approaching vehicle (the safety margin). The presence of glare resulted in a significant reduction in the safety margin used by drivers (by 0.65 s on average) and the mean number of collisions was significantly higher in the glare conditions than in the non-glare conditions. The effect of glare was larger for low-contrast than for high-contrast oncoming vehicles. Older drivers (45-60 years) had a significantly greater reduction in safety margin than younger drivers (19-29 years), though there was a large inter-individual variability in both age groups. We suggest that the reduction in retinal image contrast caused by low-sun caused drivers to overestimate the TTC with approaching vehicles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)440-450
Number of pages11
JournalOphthalmic and Physiological Optics
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Glare
Solar System
Safety
Age Groups

Keywords

  • Driving safety
  • Early cataract
  • Glare
  • Intraocular scatter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

@article{48d7abd05ea148018f3d4dd9453c3c42,
title = "Glare susceptibility test results correlate with temporal safety margin when executing turns across approaching vehicles in simulated low-sun conditions",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to compare the results of a laboratory glare susceptibility test with the execution of turns at an intersection (turns that required the driver to cross a lane containing approaching traffic). We measured glare susceptibility by means of low and high-contrast letter charts with and without a glare source. Driving performance in the absence and presence of simulated low sun was assessed using a simulator. In particular, we measured the difference between the time taken to complete a turn across the path of an approaching vehicle and the time to collision (TTC) with the approaching vehicle (the safety margin). The presence of glare resulted in a significant reduction in the safety margin used by drivers (by 0.65 s on average) and the mean number of collisions was significantly higher in the glare conditions than in the non-glare conditions. The effect of glare was larger for low-contrast than for high-contrast oncoming vehicles. Older drivers (45-60 years) had a significantly greater reduction in safety margin than younger drivers (19-29 years), though there was a large inter-individual variability in both age groups. We suggest that the reduction in retinal image contrast caused by low-sun caused drivers to overestimate the TTC with approaching vehicles.",
keywords = "Driving safety, Early cataract, Glare, Intraocular scatter",
author = "Robert Gray and David Regan",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/j.1475-1313.2007.00503.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "440--450",
journal = "Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics",
issn = "0275-5408",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Glare susceptibility test results correlate with temporal safety margin when executing turns across approaching vehicles in simulated low-sun conditions

AU - Gray, Robert

AU - Regan, David

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - The purpose of this study was to compare the results of a laboratory glare susceptibility test with the execution of turns at an intersection (turns that required the driver to cross a lane containing approaching traffic). We measured glare susceptibility by means of low and high-contrast letter charts with and without a glare source. Driving performance in the absence and presence of simulated low sun was assessed using a simulator. In particular, we measured the difference between the time taken to complete a turn across the path of an approaching vehicle and the time to collision (TTC) with the approaching vehicle (the safety margin). The presence of glare resulted in a significant reduction in the safety margin used by drivers (by 0.65 s on average) and the mean number of collisions was significantly higher in the glare conditions than in the non-glare conditions. The effect of glare was larger for low-contrast than for high-contrast oncoming vehicles. Older drivers (45-60 years) had a significantly greater reduction in safety margin than younger drivers (19-29 years), though there was a large inter-individual variability in both age groups. We suggest that the reduction in retinal image contrast caused by low-sun caused drivers to overestimate the TTC with approaching vehicles.

AB - The purpose of this study was to compare the results of a laboratory glare susceptibility test with the execution of turns at an intersection (turns that required the driver to cross a lane containing approaching traffic). We measured glare susceptibility by means of low and high-contrast letter charts with and without a glare source. Driving performance in the absence and presence of simulated low sun was assessed using a simulator. In particular, we measured the difference between the time taken to complete a turn across the path of an approaching vehicle and the time to collision (TTC) with the approaching vehicle (the safety margin). The presence of glare resulted in a significant reduction in the safety margin used by drivers (by 0.65 s on average) and the mean number of collisions was significantly higher in the glare conditions than in the non-glare conditions. The effect of glare was larger for low-contrast than for high-contrast oncoming vehicles. Older drivers (45-60 years) had a significantly greater reduction in safety margin than younger drivers (19-29 years), though there was a large inter-individual variability in both age groups. We suggest that the reduction in retinal image contrast caused by low-sun caused drivers to overestimate the TTC with approaching vehicles.

KW - Driving safety

KW - Early cataract

KW - Glare

KW - Intraocular scatter

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548088085&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548088085&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1475-1313.2007.00503.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1475-1313.2007.00503.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 17718883

AN - SCOPUS:34548088085

VL - 27

SP - 440

EP - 450

JO - Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics

JF - Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics

SN - 0275-5408

IS - 5

ER -