Geomorphic and paleoclimatic implications of latest Pleistocene radiocarbon dates from colluvium-mantled hollows, California.

S. L. Reneau, W. E. Dietrich, Ronald Dorn, C. R. Berger, M. Rubin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Radiocarbon analyses of charcoal from basal colluvium in 11 California hollows show a clustering of dates between 9000 and 15 000 BP, an indication that changes in the storage and discharge of colluvium from hillslopes accompanied the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. One hypothesis is that greater storm intensities occurred in the latest Pleistocene and induced a higher frequency of landslides in hollows and a regional extension of channel heads upslope relative to the Holocene. The increased storage of debris during the Holocene may have resulted in a diminished supply of sediment to stream channels.-from AuthorsDept of Geology & Geophysics, Univ of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-658
Number of pages4
JournalGeology
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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colluvial deposit
Holocene
Pleistocene
stream channel
hillslope
geophysics
charcoal
landslide
geology
sediment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology

Cite this

Geomorphic and paleoclimatic implications of latest Pleistocene radiocarbon dates from colluvium-mantled hollows, California. / Reneau, S. L.; Dietrich, W. E.; Dorn, Ronald; Berger, C. R.; Rubin, M.

In: Geology, Vol. 14, No. 8, 1986, p. 655-658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reneau, S. L. ; Dietrich, W. E. ; Dorn, Ronald ; Berger, C. R. ; Rubin, M. / Geomorphic and paleoclimatic implications of latest Pleistocene radiocarbon dates from colluvium-mantled hollows, California. In: Geology. 1986 ; Vol. 14, No. 8. pp. 655-658.
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AU - Rubin, M.

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