Geometry and destiny

Lawrence Krauss, Michael S. Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recognition that the cosmological constant may be non-zero forces us to re-evaluate standard notions about the connection between geometry and the fate of our Universe. An open Universe can recollapse, and a closed Universe can expand forever. As a corollary, we point out that there is no set of cosmological observations we can perform that will unambiguously allow us to determine what the ultimate destiny of the Universe will be.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1453-1459
Number of pages7
JournalGeneral Relativity and Gravitation
Volume31
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Krauss, L., & Turner, M. S. (1999). Geometry and destiny. General Relativity and Gravitation, 31(10), 1453-1459.

Geometry and destiny. / Krauss, Lawrence; Turner, Michael S.

In: General Relativity and Gravitation, Vol. 31, No. 10, 1999, p. 1453-1459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krauss, L & Turner, MS 1999, 'Geometry and destiny', General Relativity and Gravitation, vol. 31, no. 10, pp. 1453-1459.
Krauss L, Turner MS. Geometry and destiny. General Relativity and Gravitation. 1999;31(10):1453-1459.
Krauss, Lawrence ; Turner, Michael S. / Geometry and destiny. In: General Relativity and Gravitation. 1999 ; Vol. 31, No. 10. pp. 1453-1459.
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