Geology of Panamint Valley- Saline Valley pull-apart system, California: palinspastic evidence for low-angle geometry of a Neogene range-bounding fault.

B. C. Burchfiel, Kip Hodges, L. H. Royden

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101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Palinspastic reconstruction of northern Panamint Valley indicates that the valley was formed by movement on a shallow crustal, low-angle normal fault of 0-15 degree west dip during the last 3.0Ma. This interpretation appears to contradict the notions that little extension is accommodated in the uppermost crust by low- angle faulting and that the most recent extension in the Basin and Range Province is accommodated exclusively by high-angle faulting. Saline Valley, however, is interpreted to have formed by extension on closely spaced, rotated planar normal faults. Thus, within one geometric system of paired pull-apart basins, extension appears to have been accommodated in the shallow crust in two different ways.-from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume92
Issue numberB10
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Faulting
Geology
geology
Neogene
valleys
valley
geometry
Geometry
normal fault
crusts
faulting
crust
pull apart basin
dip
basin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

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title = "Geology of Panamint Valley- Saline Valley pull-apart system, California: palinspastic evidence for low-angle geometry of a Neogene range-bounding fault.",
abstract = "Palinspastic reconstruction of northern Panamint Valley indicates that the valley was formed by movement on a shallow crustal, low-angle normal fault of 0-15 degree west dip during the last 3.0Ma. This interpretation appears to contradict the notions that little extension is accommodated in the uppermost crust by low- angle faulting and that the most recent extension in the Basin and Range Province is accommodated exclusively by high-angle faulting. Saline Valley, however, is interpreted to have formed by extension on closely spaced, rotated planar normal faults. Thus, within one geometric system of paired pull-apart basins, extension appears to have been accommodated in the shallow crust in two different ways.-from Authors",
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year = "1987",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "92",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres",
issn = "2169-897X",
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T1 - Geology of Panamint Valley- Saline Valley pull-apart system, California

T2 - palinspastic evidence for low-angle geometry of a Neogene range-bounding fault.

AU - Burchfiel, B. C.

AU - Hodges, Kip

AU - Royden, L. H.

PY - 1987

Y1 - 1987

N2 - Palinspastic reconstruction of northern Panamint Valley indicates that the valley was formed by movement on a shallow crustal, low-angle normal fault of 0-15 degree west dip during the last 3.0Ma. This interpretation appears to contradict the notions that little extension is accommodated in the uppermost crust by low- angle faulting and that the most recent extension in the Basin and Range Province is accommodated exclusively by high-angle faulting. Saline Valley, however, is interpreted to have formed by extension on closely spaced, rotated planar normal faults. Thus, within one geometric system of paired pull-apart basins, extension appears to have been accommodated in the shallow crust in two different ways.-from Authors

AB - Palinspastic reconstruction of northern Panamint Valley indicates that the valley was formed by movement on a shallow crustal, low-angle normal fault of 0-15 degree west dip during the last 3.0Ma. This interpretation appears to contradict the notions that little extension is accommodated in the uppermost crust by low- angle faulting and that the most recent extension in the Basin and Range Province is accommodated exclusively by high-angle faulting. Saline Valley, however, is interpreted to have formed by extension on closely spaced, rotated planar normal faults. Thus, within one geometric system of paired pull-apart basins, extension appears to have been accommodated in the shallow crust in two different ways.-from Authors

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