Geologic mapping of Vesta

R. A. Yingst, S. C. Mest, D. C. Berman, W. B. Garry, David Williams, D. Buczkowski, R. Jaumann, C. M. Pieters, M. C. De Sanctis, A. Frigeri, L. Le Corre, F. Preusker, C. A. Raymond, V. Reddy, C. T. Russell, T. Roatsch, P. M. Schenk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-23
Number of pages22
JournalPlanetary and Space Science
Volume103
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2014

Fingerprint

craters
crater
ridges
troughs
trough
volcanic feature
mass wasting
impact structure
deposits
rims
data acquisition
volcanology
orbits
escarpments
landslides
globes
stratigraphy
low altitude
ejecta
high altitude

Keywords

  • Dawn
  • Geologic mapping
  • Vesta

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Yingst, R. A., Mest, S. C., Berman, D. C., Garry, W. B., Williams, D., Buczkowski, D., ... Schenk, P. M. (2014). Geologic mapping of Vesta. Planetary and Space Science, 103, 2-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2013.12.014

Geologic mapping of Vesta. / Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, David; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

In: Planetary and Space Science, Vol. 103, 15.11.2014, p. 2-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yingst, RA, Mest, SC, Berman, DC, Garry, WB, Williams, D, Buczkowski, D, Jaumann, R, Pieters, CM, De Sanctis, MC, Frigeri, A, Le Corre, L, Preusker, F, Raymond, CA, Reddy, V, Russell, CT, Roatsch, T & Schenk, PM 2014, 'Geologic mapping of Vesta', Planetary and Space Science, vol. 103, pp. 2-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2013.12.014
Yingst RA, Mest SC, Berman DC, Garry WB, Williams D, Buczkowski D et al. Geologic mapping of Vesta. Planetary and Space Science. 2014 Nov 15;103:2-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2013.12.014
Yingst, R. A. ; Mest, S. C. ; Berman, D. C. ; Garry, W. B. ; Williams, David ; Buczkowski, D. ; Jaumann, R. ; Pieters, C. M. ; De Sanctis, M. C. ; Frigeri, A. ; Le Corre, L. ; Preusker, F. ; Raymond, C. A. ; Reddy, V. ; Russell, C. T. ; Roatsch, T. ; Schenk, P. M. / Geologic mapping of Vesta. In: Planetary and Space Science. 2014 ; Vol. 103. pp. 2-23.
@article{f9d55029aa9440628749c80b9a9de2c3,
title = "Geologic mapping of Vesta",
abstract = "We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.",
keywords = "Dawn, Geologic mapping, Vesta",
author = "Yingst, {R. A.} and Mest, {S. C.} and Berman, {D. C.} and Garry, {W. B.} and David Williams and D. Buczkowski and R. Jaumann and Pieters, {C. M.} and {De Sanctis}, {M. C.} and A. Frigeri and {Le Corre}, L. and F. Preusker and Raymond, {C. A.} and V. Reddy and Russell, {C. T.} and T. Roatsch and Schenk, {P. M.}",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.pss.2013.12.014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "103",
pages = "2--23",
journal = "Planetary and Space Science",
issn = "0032-0633",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geologic mapping of Vesta

AU - Yingst, R. A.

AU - Mest, S. C.

AU - Berman, D. C.

AU - Garry, W. B.

AU - Williams, David

AU - Buczkowski, D.

AU - Jaumann, R.

AU - Pieters, C. M.

AU - De Sanctis, M. C.

AU - Frigeri, A.

AU - Le Corre, L.

AU - Preusker, F.

AU - Raymond, C. A.

AU - Reddy, V.

AU - Russell, C. T.

AU - Roatsch, T.

AU - Schenk, P. M.

PY - 2014/11/15

Y1 - 2014/11/15

N2 - We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.

AB - We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.

KW - Dawn

KW - Geologic mapping

KW - Vesta

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84908297565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84908297565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pss.2013.12.014

DO - 10.1016/j.pss.2013.12.014

M3 - Article

VL - 103

SP - 2

EP - 23

JO - Planetary and Space Science

JF - Planetary and Space Science

SN - 0032-0633

ER -