Genetically modified labeling: The role of consumers' trust and personality

Karen Lewis Delong, Carola Grebitus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the USDA's genetically modified (GM) regulatory approval process, many U.S. consumers still want GM foods labeled. Therefore, this research identifies how individuals' trust in the ability of institutions to ensure the safety of food, their personality, and their demographics affects their desire for GM foods to be labeled. A survey was administered to 566 consumers to elicit their desire for GM labeling of sugar and sugar in soft drinks. Results of a bivariate ordered probit model suggest that less conscientious individuals, males, and individuals who have a greater trust in food manufacturers and the government to ensure the safety of food are less likely to desire GM labeling. Cluster analysis further identified market segments of individuals based on their level of desire for GM labeling. Results are informative to policy makers and GM technology participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAgribusiness
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Genetically Modified Food
genetically modified foods
Food Safety
food safety
Personality
personality
food
sugars
Carbonated Beverages
United States Department of Agriculture
soft drinks
Aptitude
Administrative Personnel
USDA
Cluster Analysis
food industry
cluster analysis
demographic statistics
Demography
markets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Genetically modified labeling : The role of consumers' trust and personality. / Delong, Karen Lewis; Grebitus, Carola.

In: Agribusiness, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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