Genetic underpinnings of survey response

Lori Foster Thompson, Zhen Zhang, Richard D. Arvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the influence of genetic factors on survey response behavior. A pool of 558 male and 500 female twin pairs from the Minnesota Twin Registry (MTR) was asked to complete a paper-and-pencil survey of leadership activities. We used quantitative genetics techniques to estimate the genetic, shared environmental, and nonshared environmental effects on people's compliance with the request for survey participation. Results indicated that genetic influences explained 45% of the variance in survey response behavior for both women and men, with little shared environmental effects. Similar estimates were obtained after we partialled out potential confounds including twin closeness, age, and education. The results have important implications for response rates and nonresponse bias in survey-based research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-412
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

response behavior
Genetic Techniques
heredity
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
leadership
Education
participation
trend
Research
education
Environmental effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Genetic underpinnings of survey response. / Thompson, Lori Foster; Zhang, Zhen; Arvey, Richard D.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 32, No. 3, 04.2011, p. 395-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, Lori Foster ; Zhang, Zhen ; Arvey, Richard D. / Genetic underpinnings of survey response. In: Journal of Organizational Behavior. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 395-412.
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