Genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease and its impact on insurance purchasing behavior

Cathleen D. Zick, Charles J. Mathews, J. Scott Roberts, Robert Cook-Deegan, Robert J. Pokorski, Robert C. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

New genetic tests for adult-onset diseases raise concerns about possible adverse selection in insurance markets. To test for this behavior, we followed 148 cognitively normal people participating in a randomized clinical trial of genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease for one year after risk assessment and Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype disclosure. Although no significant differences were found in health, life, or disability insurance purchases, those who tested positive were 5.76 times more likely to have altered their long-term care insurance than those who did not receive APOE genotype disclosure. If genetic testing for Alzheimer's risk assessment becomes common, it could trigger adverse selection in long-term care insurance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-490
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Long-Term Care Insurance
long-term care insurance
Disclosure
Genetic Testing
Apolipoproteins E
Insurance
dementia
risk assessment
insurance
Alzheimer Disease
Disability Insurance
Genotype
Life Insurance
genetic test
Health Insurance
purchase
Randomized Controlled Trials
Disease
market
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease and its impact on insurance purchasing behavior. / Zick, Cathleen D.; Mathews, Charles J.; Roberts, J. Scott; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Pokorski, Robert J.; Green, Robert C.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 24, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 483-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zick, Cathleen D. ; Mathews, Charles J. ; Roberts, J. Scott ; Cook-Deegan, Robert ; Pokorski, Robert J. ; Green, Robert C. / Genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease and its impact on insurance purchasing behavior. In: Health Affairs. 2005 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 483-490.
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