Genetic structure of chimpanzee populations

Celine Becquet, Nick Patterson, Anne Stone, Molly Przeworski, David Reich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about the history and population structure of our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees, in part because of an extremely poor fossil record. To address this, we report the largest genetic study of the chimpanzees to date, examining 310 microsatellites in 84 common chimpanzees and bonobos. We infer three common chimpanzee populations, which correspond to the previously defined labels of "western," "central," and "eastern," and find little evidence of gene flow between them. There is tentative evidence for structure within western chimpanzees, but we do not detect distinct additional populations. The data also provide historical insights, demonstrating that the western chimpanzee population diverged first, and that the eastern and central populations are more closely related in time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)617-626
Number of pages10
JournalPLoS genetics
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Becquet, C., Patterson, N., Stone, A., Przeworski, M., & Reich, D. (2007). Genetic structure of chimpanzee populations. PLoS genetics, 3(4), 617-626. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.0030066