Genetic, environmental, and gender effects on individual differences in toddler expressive language

Carol A. Van Hulle, H. H. Goldsmith, Kathryn Lemery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this article, the authors examined the genetic and environmental factors influencing expressive language development in a sample of 386 toddler twin pairs participating in the Wisconsin Twin Project. Expressive language was assessed using 2 measures from the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories-Short Form: Total Vocabulary and Two-Word Combination Use (L. Fenson et al., 2000). A sex-limitation structural equation model estimated the contribution of genetics, shared environment, and nonshared environment to individual variation. For vocabulary, heritability was higher for boys than for girls (20% vs. 8%). For word combination use, heritability was higher for girls (28% vs. 10%). However, the majority of individual variation in both boys and girls could be attributed to shared environment (54%-78%).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)904-912
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

Keywords

  • Gender differences
  • Language
  • Toddlerhood
  • Twins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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