Generalizing the predictive relationship between 1-month motor skill retention and Rey–Osterrieth Delayed Recall scores from nondemented older adults to individuals with chronic stroke: a short report

Jennapher Lingo VanGilder, Andrew Hooyman, Pamela R. Bosch, Sydney Y. Schaefer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Motor learning is fundamental to motor rehabilitation outcomes. There is growing evidence from non-neurological populations supporting the role of visuospatial memory function in motor learning, but current predictive models of motor recovery of individuals with stroke generally exclude cognitive measures, thereby overlooking the potential link between motor learning and visuospatial memory. Recent work has demonstrated that a clinical test of visuospatial memory (Rey–Osterrieth Complex Figure Delayed Recall) may predict 1-month skill learning in older adults; however, whether this relationship persists in individuals with chronic stroke remains unknown. The purpose of this short report was to validate previous findings using Rey–Osterrieth Complex Figure Delayed Recall test scores to predict motor learning and determine if this relationship generalized to a set of individuals post-stroke. Two regression models (one including Delayed Recall scores and one without) were trained using data from non-stroke older adults. To determine the extent to which Delayed Recall test scores impacted prediction accuracy of 1-month skill learning in older adults, we used leave-one-out cross-validation to evaluate the prediction error between models. To test if this predictive relationship generalized to individuals with chronic ischemic stroke, we then tested each trained model on an independent stroke dataset. Results indicated that in both stroke and older adult datasets, inclusion of Delayed Recall scores explained significantly more variance of 1-month skill performance than models that included age, education, and baseline motor performance alone. This proof-of-concept suggests that the relationship between delayed visuospatial memory and 1-month motor skill performance generalizes to individuals with chronic stroke, and supports the idea that visuospatial testing may provide prognostic insight into clinical motor rehabilitation outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number94
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Model validation
  • Motor learning
  • Stroke rehabilitation
  • Upper extremity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

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