Gender, Working Conditions and the Job Satisfaction of Women in a Non‐Traditional Occupation: Female Correctional Officers in Men's Prisons

Nancy Jurik, Gregory J. Halemba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the recent interest in women working in nontraditional occupations, few analyses have systematically compared the work‐related attitudes of such women with those of men holding the same positions. This article presents an exploratory analysis, drawing hypotheses from the “gender” and “job” models described by Feldberg and Glenn (1979), to compare work‐related attitudes among male and female correctional officers. Data drawn from a survey of male and female correctional officers working at the same prison facility (three male and one female units) are utilized to contrast the importance of gender, with experiences on the job as determinants of job satisfaction. The results support the job model, which suggests that the attitudes of working women are a function of their position in the organizational structure and immediate working conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-566
Number of pages16
JournalSociological Quarterly
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

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working conditions
job satisfaction
correctional institution
occupation
working woman
gender
organizational structure
determinants
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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