Gender wage gap in online gig economy and gender differences in job preferences

Chen Liang, Yili Hong, Bin Gu, Jing Peng

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We explore whether there exists gender wage gap in the gig economy and examine to what degree gender differences in job application strategy could account for the gap. With a large-scale dataset from a leading online labor market, we show that females only earn around 81.4% of the hourly wage of their male counterparts. We further investigate three main aspects of job application strategy, namely bid timing, job selection, and avoidance of monitoring. After matching males with females using the propensity score matching method, we find that females tend to bid later and prefer jobs with a lower budget. In particular, the observed gender difference in bid timing can explain 7.6% of the difference in hourly wage, which could account for 41% of the gender wage gap (i.e. 18.6%) observed by us. Moreover, taking advantage of a natural experiment wherein the platform rolled out the monitoring system, we find that females are less willing to bid for monitored jobs than males. To further quantify the economic value of the gender difference in avoidance of monitoring, we run a field experiment on Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT), which suggests that females tend to have a higher willingness to pay (WTP) for the avoidance of monitoring. The gender difference in WTP for the avoidance of monitoring can explain 8.1% of the difference in hourly wage, namely, 44% of the observed gender wage gap. Overall, our study reveals the important role of job application strategies in the persistent gender wage gap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
ISBN (Electronic)9780996683173
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event39th International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2018 - San Francisco, United States
Duration: Dec 13 2018Dec 16 2018

Publication series

NameInternational Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018

Conference

Conference39th International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2018
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period12/13/1812/16/18

Fingerprint

Gender Differences
Wages
wage
gender-specific factors
economy
gender
monitoring
Monitoring
willingness to pay
Timing
Tend
Propensity Score
Field Experiment
Turk
experiment
economic value
Gender
Gender wage gap
Gender differences
Monitoring System

Keywords

  • Gender wage gap
  • Gig economy
  • Job application strategy
  • Quasi-natural experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Liang, C., Hong, Y., Gu, B., & Peng, J. (2018). Gender wage gap in online gig economy and gender differences in job preferences. In International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018 (International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018). Association for Information Systems.

Gender wage gap in online gig economy and gender differences in job preferences. / Liang, Chen; Hong, Yili; Gu, Bin; Peng, Jing.

International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018. Association for Information Systems, 2018. (International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Liang, C, Hong, Y, Gu, B & Peng, J 2018, Gender wage gap in online gig economy and gender differences in job preferences. in International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018. International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018, Association for Information Systems, 39th International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2018, San Francisco, United States, 12/13/18.
Liang C, Hong Y, Gu B, Peng J. Gender wage gap in online gig economy and gender differences in job preferences. In International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018. Association for Information Systems. 2018. (International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018).
Liang, Chen ; Hong, Yili ; Gu, Bin ; Peng, Jing. / Gender wage gap in online gig economy and gender differences in job preferences. International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018. Association for Information Systems, 2018. (International Conference on Information Systems 2018, ICIS 2018).
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