Gender, social difference and coastal resource management in lowland Philippine fishing communities

James F. Eder

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This paper considers how an effort to institutionalize coastal resource management (CRM) at the municipal level in the Philippines has unfolded against the class, ethnic, and gender divisions characteristic of lowland Philippine society. It draws inspiration from recent suggestions that the study of community-based natural resource management would be better served by focusing on institutions rather than on community per se (King and Durrenberger 2000; Agrawal and Gibson 2001) and, more particularly, on how institutions shape (and are shaped by) the multiple interests and actors within communities (Agrawal and Gibson 1999, p. 640). Of special interest here is how institutional arrangements may influence both the reality and the perception of local community participation, which is much sought-after in resource management projects in general.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHuman Ecology: Contemporary Research and Practice
PublisherSpringer US
Pages317-329
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781441957009
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Philippines
gender
management
resources
community
project management
natural resources
participation
Resource Management
Fishing
Coast
Natural Resource Management
Arrangement
Community Participation
Local Communities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Eder, J. F. (2010). Gender, social difference and coastal resource management in lowland Philippine fishing communities. In Human Ecology: Contemporary Research and Practice (pp. 317-329). Springer US. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-5701-6_20

Gender, social difference and coastal resource management in lowland Philippine fishing communities. / Eder, James F.

Human Ecology: Contemporary Research and Practice. Springer US, 2010. p. 317-329.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Eder, JF 2010, Gender, social difference and coastal resource management in lowland Philippine fishing communities. in Human Ecology: Contemporary Research and Practice. Springer US, pp. 317-329. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-5701-6_20
Eder, James F. / Gender, social difference and coastal resource management in lowland Philippine fishing communities. Human Ecology: Contemporary Research and Practice. Springer US, 2010. pp. 317-329
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