Gender roles and substance use among mexican american adolescents: A relationship moderated by acculturation?

Stephen Kulis, Flavio Marsiglia, Julie L. Nagoshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research assesses the effects of adaptive/ maladaptive gender roles and acculturation in predicting substance use in a 2007 sample of 1466 Mexican American seventh-grade adolescents from Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Multiple regression analyses found significant effects for both adaptive and maladaptive gender roles, as well as several gender-specific interactions between gender roles and linguistic acculturation that predicted substance use. Limitations of the research are noted, as well as implications for understanding the impact of acculturation on how gender roles differentially affect substance use in Mexican American boys versus girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-229
Number of pages16
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Acculturation
acculturation
gender role
adolescent
Linguistics
Research
linguistics
regression
Regression Analysis
gender
interaction

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Gender
  • Gender roles
  • Mexican American adolescents
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gender roles and substance use among mexican american adolescents : A relationship moderated by acculturation? / Kulis, Stephen; Marsiglia, Flavio; Nagoshi, Julie L.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 47, No. 3, 02.2012, p. 214-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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