Gender Role Attitudes: Who Supports Expanded Rights for Women in Afghanistan?

Lynne L. Manganaro, Nicholas Alozie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use survey data from a national probability sample of 6,593 adult Afghans and multivariate regression that estimates the effects of several factors on separate indices of gender role attitudes generated by exploratory factor analysis to explore whether men and women differ in their gender role attitudes and the extent to which ecological and socio-demographic factors may mediate both within- and across-group differences. We find that men and women differ in their gender role attitudes, as men report more conservative attitudes than women. These differences manifest whether gender role attitude is measured as procuring basic rights for women, or empowering women politically. Moreover, men and women's gender role attitudes are not immutable-education, ethnicity, and urbanization and, in women's case, generational replacement-all act to mediate these differences. The profile of the Afghan man who would hold liberal gender role attitudes is an educated urbanite, non-Sunni or non-Pashtun, who believes in the compatibility of democracy and Islam, trusts outsiders, has exposure to the formal media, and would extend equal rights to all irrespective of gender, religion, or ethnicity. That of the woman is of a younger, educated urbanite, non-Pashtun, who believes in the compatibility of democracy and Islam, trusts outsiders, has exposure to the formal media, and would extend equal rights to all regardless of gender, religion, or ethnicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)516-529
Number of pages14
JournalSex Roles
Volume64
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Afghanistan
Women's Rights
gender role
ethnicity
Democracy
Islam
Religion
democracy
women's role
gender
demographic factors
Sampling Studies
Urbanization
urbanization
factor analysis
Statistical Factor Analysis
regression
Demography
Education

Keywords

  • Afghanistan
  • Gender role attitudes
  • Gender role orientation
  • Islamic women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Gender Role Attitudes : Who Supports Expanded Rights for Women in Afghanistan? / Manganaro, Lynne L.; Alozie, Nicholas.

In: Sex Roles, Vol. 64, No. 7-8, 04.2011, p. 516-529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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