Gender gaps in achievement and participation inmultiple introductory biology classrooms

Sarah L. Eddy, Sara Brownell, Mary Pat Wenderoth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although gender gaps have been a major concern in male-dominated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines such as physics and engineering, the numerical dominance of female students in biology has supported the assumption that gender disparities do not exist at the undergraduate level in life sciences. Using data from 23 large introductory biology classes for majors, we examine twomeasures of gender disparity in biology: academic achievement and participation in whole-class discussions.We found that females consistently underperform on exams compared with males with similar overall college grade point averages. In addition, although females on average represent 60% of the students in these courses, their voices make up less than 40% of those heard responding to instructor-posed questions to the class, one of the most common ways of engaging students in large lectures. Based on these data, we propose that, despite numerical dominance of females, gender disparities remain an issue in introductory biology classrooms. For student retention and achievement in biology to be truly merit based, we need to develop strategies to equalize the opportunities for students of different genders to practice the skills they need to excel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-492
Number of pages15
JournalCBE Life Sciences Education
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2014

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biology
Students
classroom
participation
gender
student
engineering
Biological Science Disciplines
Mathematics
life sciences
Physics
female student
academic achievement
physics
instructor
mathematics
Technology
science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Gender gaps in achievement and participation inmultiple introductory biology classrooms. / Eddy, Sarah L.; Brownell, Sara; Wenderoth, Mary Pat.

In: CBE Life Sciences Education, Vol. 13, No. 3, 02.09.2014, p. 478-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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