Gender differences related to heterosexual condom use: The influence of negotiation styles

James A. Carter, Lily D. McNair, William R. Corbin, Michelle Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study had three primary goals. The first was to identify gender differences related to negotiation styles associated with condom use. We hypothesized that women would report engaging in more negotiation behaviors associated with condom use than men. The second goal was to determine whether the relationships between intentions to use condoms and past condom use for women and men were moderated by negotiation behaviors. The third goal was to examine gender differences in responses to an open-ended question inquiring why participants did not use condoms. Male and female college students (N = 219) anonymously completed a series of measures. The results indicated that women and men have unique roles in the negotiation process; women play a more active role in negotiation of condom use, while men play a more reactive role. The relationship between intentions to use condoms and past condom use increased for men when their partners were more active in the process of deciding whether to use condoms. Responses to the open-ended item revealed that women identified perceptions of low risk as the most common reason for not using condoms, while men identified the inconvenience or unavailability of condoms as the most common reason. The implications of these results are discussed as they relate to health efforts to increase condom use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-225
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sex and Marital Therapy
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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