Gender and politics in the Henrician court: The Douglas-Howard lyrics in the Devonshire manuscript (BL Add 17492)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BL Additional MS 17492, the so-called DevonshireManuscript of Henrician courtly verse, is a prime example of how social and cultural phenomena contributed to early modern manuscript culture. Among the treasures of the Devonshire MS is a series of lyrics that chronicles a fascinating courtly intrigue of the 1530s: the illicit, clandestine marriage of Lord Thomas Howard and Lady Margaret Douglas, the headstrong niece of Henry VIII. After unpacking this historical drama, this essay advances the first substantial literary analysis of these poems by exploring the textual strategies through which Howard and Douglas attempted to negotiate the crown's insistent management of their erotic life. This treatment of the Douglas-Howard lyrics provides new opportunity to consider how the Devonshire MS reflects and refracts the gender dynamics of the contemporary Henrician court.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-114
Number of pages36
JournalRenaissance Quarterly
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Lyrics
Manuscripts
Chronicles
Marriage
Historical Drama
Henry VIII
Cultural Phenomena
1530s
Literary Analysis
Poem
Manuscript Culture
Verse
Intrigue
Treasure
Social Phenomena

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

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abstract = "BL Additional MS 17492, the so-called DevonshireManuscript of Henrician courtly verse, is a prime example of how social and cultural phenomena contributed to early modern manuscript culture. Among the treasures of the Devonshire MS is a series of lyrics that chronicles a fascinating courtly intrigue of the 1530s: the illicit, clandestine marriage of Lord Thomas Howard and Lady Margaret Douglas, the headstrong niece of Henry VIII. After unpacking this historical drama, this essay advances the first substantial literary analysis of these poems by exploring the textual strategies through which Howard and Douglas attempted to negotiate the crown's insistent management of their erotic life. This treatment of the Douglas-Howard lyrics provides new opportunity to consider how the Devonshire MS reflects and refracts the gender dynamics of the contemporary Henrician court.",
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