Game features and individual differences: Interactive effects on motivation and performance

Matthew E. Jacovina, Erica L. Snow, G. Tanner Jackson, Danielle McNamara

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

To optimize the benefits of game-based practice within Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs), researchers examine how game features influence students' motivation and performance. The current study examined the influence of game features and individual differences (reading ability and learning intentions) on motivation and performance. Participants (n = 58) viewed lesson videos in iSTART-2, an ITS designed to improve reading comprehension skills, and practiced with either a game-like activity or a minimally game-like activity. No main effects of game environment were observed. However, there was an interaction between game environment and pretest learning intentions in predicting students’ self-reported effort. The correlation between learning intentions and self-reported effort was not significant for students who practiced with the more game-like activity, whereas it was for students who practiced in the less game-like activity. We discuss the implications for this interaction and how it might drive future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages642-645
Number of pages4
Volume9112
ISBN (Print)9783319197722
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Event17th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, AIED 2015 - Madrid, Spain
Duration: Jun 22 2015Jun 26 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9112
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other17th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, AIED 2015
CountrySpain
CityMadrid
Period6/22/156/26/15

Fingerprint

Individual Differences
Game
Students
Intelligent systems
Intelligent Tutoring Systems
Pre-test
Main Effect
Interaction
Optimise

Keywords

  • Game-based learning
  • Intelligent Tutoring Systems
  • Motivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Jacovina, M. E., Snow, E. L., Tanner Jackson, G., & McNamara, D. (2015). Game features and individual differences: Interactive effects on motivation and performance. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 9112, pp. 642-645). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9112). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19773-9_81

Game features and individual differences : Interactive effects on motivation and performance. / Jacovina, Matthew E.; Snow, Erica L.; Tanner Jackson, G.; McNamara, Danielle.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9112 Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 642-645 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9112).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jacovina, ME, Snow, EL, Tanner Jackson, G & McNamara, D 2015, Game features and individual differences: Interactive effects on motivation and performance. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 9112, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 9112, Springer Verlag, pp. 642-645, 17th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, AIED 2015, Madrid, Spain, 6/22/15. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19773-9_81
Jacovina ME, Snow EL, Tanner Jackson G, McNamara D. Game features and individual differences: Interactive effects on motivation and performance. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9112. Springer Verlag. 2015. p. 642-645. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19773-9_81
Jacovina, Matthew E. ; Snow, Erica L. ; Tanner Jackson, G. ; McNamara, Danielle. / Game features and individual differences : Interactive effects on motivation and performance. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9112 Springer Verlag, 2015. pp. 642-645 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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