Fundamentalism as dogmatic belief, moral rigorism, and strong groupness across cultures: Dimensionality, underlying components, and related interreligious prejudice.

Vassilis Saroglou, Magali Clobert, Adam B. Cohen, Kathryn A. Johnson, Kevin L. Ladd, Pierre Yves Brandt, Sebastian Murken, Antonio Muñoz-García, Lucia Adamovova, Joanna Blogowska, Cem Safak Çukur, Kwang Kuo Hwang, Anna Miglietta, Frosso Motti-Stefanidi, Nicolas Roussiau, Javier Tapia Valladares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Is fundamentalism universal across religious cultures? We investigated this issue by focusing on 3 questions: (a) the dimensionality of fundamentalism, as measured by the Religious Fundamentalism Scale (Altemeyer & Hunsberger, 2004); (b) the very nature of fundamentalism as denoting dogmatic belief, moral rigorism, or strong groupness; and (c) interreligious prejudice as predicted uniquely, additively, or interactively by religiousness and sociocognitive rigidity. We collected data from 14 countries of Catholic, Protestant, Christian Orthodox, Buddhist, Jewish, and Muslim tradition, regrouped in 7 cultural-religious zones (N = 3,218 young adults). We measured fundamentalism, the 4 dimensions of religiousness (believing, bonding, behaving, and belonging), authoritarianism, existential quest, and interreligious prejudice—negative and discriminatory attitudes toward various religious outgroups and atheists. Across religious cultures, we found that: (a) the scale is unidimensional; (b) fundamentalism is best conceptualized as a combination of dogmatic belief (believing and low existential quest) and moral rigorism (behaving and authoritarianism) and occasionally as strong groupness (belonging and authoritarianism); (c) religious dimensions, additively to and interactively with, authoritarianism and low existential quest predict interreligious prejudice (in monotheistic cultures); and (d) anti-Muslim attitudes were the highest, but fundamentalism and religiousness related most strongly to antiatheist sentiments. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychology of Religion and Spirituality
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • dogmatism
  • fundamentalism
  • morality
  • prejudice
  • religious diversity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Religious studies
  • Applied Psychology

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