Functional and structural differences in the hippocampus associated with memory deficits in adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Michelle Monje, Moriah E. Thomason, Laura Rigolo, Yalin Wang, Deborah P. Waber, Stephen E. Sallan, Alexandra J. Golby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Radiation and chemotherapy targeted to the central nervous system (CNS) can cause cognitive impairment, including impaired memory. These memory impairments may be referable to damage to hippocampal structures resulting from CNS treatment. Procedure: In the present study, we explored episodic memory and its neuroimaging correlates in 10 adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with cranial radiation therapy and both systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and 10 controls matched for age and sex, using a subsequent memory paradigm after episodic encoding of visual scenes. Results: We report behavioral, structural, and functional changes in the brains of the adult survivors. They demonstrated poorer recognition memory, hippocampal atrophy, and altered blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the hippocampus. Whole brain statistical map analysis revealed increased BOLD signal/activation in several brain regions during unsuccessful encoding in ALL survivors, potentially reflecting ineffective neural recruitment. Individual differences in memory performance in ALL participants were related to magnitude of BOLD response in regions associated with successful encoding. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings describe long term neuroimaging correlates of cognitive dysfunction after childhood exposure to CNS-targeted cancer therapies, suggesting enduring damage to episodic memory systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-300
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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Memory Disorders
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Hippocampus
Episodic Memory
Central Nervous System
Neuroimaging
Brain
Background Radiation
Drug Therapy
Individuality
Atrophy
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • ALL
  • FMRI
  • Hippocampus
  • Late effects of cancer therapy
  • Memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology

Cite this

Functional and structural differences in the hippocampus associated with memory deficits in adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. / Monje, Michelle; Thomason, Moriah E.; Rigolo, Laura; Wang, Yalin; Waber, Deborah P.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Golby, Alexandra J.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 60, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 293-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monje, Michelle ; Thomason, Moriah E. ; Rigolo, Laura ; Wang, Yalin ; Waber, Deborah P. ; Sallan, Stephen E. ; Golby, Alexandra J. / Functional and structural differences in the hippocampus associated with memory deficits in adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 60, No. 2. pp. 293-300.
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