Full- and Part-Time Dissent: Examining the Effect of Employment Status on Dissent Expression

Jeffrey Kassing, Shea A. Fanelli, Laasya Chakravarthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined whether employment status affected the amount and type of dissent employees expressed to management. To address this full-time and part-time employees in separate data collections completed the Upward Dissent Scale. A comparison of participant scores indicated that full-time employees used comparatively more prosocial (direct-factual appeals and solution presentation) and repetition upward dissent tactics compared to part-time employees. Contrastingly, part-time employees relied more heavily on upward dissent expressions that involved circumventing their bosses and threatening to quit their jobs. The findings indicate that employment status has a notable effect on the expression of upward dissent—with full- and part-time employees relying on differing tactics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-465
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Business Communication
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Employees
Employment status
Dissent
Tactics
Quits
Data collection

Keywords

  • employee dissent
  • employment status
  • full- and part-time workers
  • organizational dissent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Full- and Part-Time Dissent : Examining the Effect of Employment Status on Dissent Expression. / Kassing, Jeffrey; Fanelli, Shea A.; Chakravarthy, Laasya.

In: International Journal of Business Communication, Vol. 55, No. 4, 01.10.2018, p. 455-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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