Fresnel modeling of hematite crystal surfaces and application to martian hematite spherules

Timothy D. Glotch, Philip Christensen, Thomas Sharp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gray crystalline hematite at Meridiani Planum first discovered by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) instrument occurs as spherules that have been interpreted as concretions. Analysis of the TES and mini-TES spectra shows that no 390 cm-1 feature is present in the characteristic martian hematite spectrum. Here, we incorporate the mid-IR optical constants of hematite into a simple Fresnel reflectance model to understand the effect of emission angle and crystal morphology on the presence or absence of the 390 cm-1 feature in an IR hematite spectrum. Based on the results we offer two models for the internal structure of the martian hematite spherules.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-418
Number of pages11
JournalIcarus
Volume181
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

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spherules
spherule
hematite
crystal surfaces
crystal
modeling
Mars Global Surveyor
crystal morphology
concretion
thermal emission
Mars
reflectance
spectrometer
spectrometers

Keywords

  • Infrared observations
  • Mars, surface
  • Mineralogy
  • Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Fresnel modeling of hematite crystal surfaces and application to martian hematite spherules. / Glotch, Timothy D.; Christensen, Philip; Sharp, Thomas.

In: Icarus, Vol. 181, No. 2, 04.2006, p. 408-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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