Frankenstein in Grozny: vertical and horizontal cracks in the foundation of Kadyrov’s rule

Emil Aslan Souleimanov, Namig Abbasov, David Siroky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many scholars have suggested that organized violence in Chechnya has ended, and that Russia’s Chechenization policy and Ramzan Kadyrov’s presidency deserve the credit. We suggest that Putin has created a Frankenstein-like ruler over whom he risks losing control. As a result, the conflict only appears resolved, and we draw attention to both vertical and horizontal cracks in the foundation of Kadyrov’s rule that could lead to renewed violence. Vertically, the Chechen strongman and his growing clout in regional and federal politics have antagonized Russian siloviki. Horizontally, thousands of Chechens appear to be in a state of postponed blood feud toward Kadyrov, his clan, and the kadyrovtsy, his personal army. Backed by President Putin’s personal support, Kadyrov has put in motion a brutal machine of persecution over which some signs indicate he has lost control. Fear of extermination at the hands of the Kadyrov and his personal army has kept most prospective avengers at a bay. Once President Putin’s support wanes, locals will retaliate against Kadyrov and against Russian troops stationed in the republic, and Russian law enforcement circles will openly challenge Kadyrov’s rule. Putin’s support is only likely to wither if the costs of continued support (which grow with Kadyrov’s increasing independence) exceed the benefits (derived from an enforced peace). Either a renewed insurgency or ever more recalcitrant behavior would demonstrate a level of interest misalignment that could induce Putin to withdraw his support. Such a turn of events would render these horizontal and vertical cracks in the foundation of Kadyrov’s rule more noticeable and would likely to cause the frozen conflict in Chechnya to thaw, leading to a new civil war.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAsia Europe Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Chechnya
military
turn of events
president
violence
law enforcement
civil war
republic
credit
peace
Russia
anxiety
cause
politics
costs
Credit
Presidency
Costs
Law enforcement
Misalignment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Frankenstein in Grozny : vertical and horizontal cracks in the foundation of Kadyrov’s rule. / Souleimanov, Emil Aslan; Abbasov, Namig; Siroky, David.

In: Asia Europe Journal, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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