Four pathways to young-adult smoking status: adolescent social-psychological antecedents in a midwestern community sample.

Laurie Chassin, Clark Presson, S. J. Sherman, D. A. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evaluated the ability of social-psychological factors, measured in adolescence, to predict young-adult smoking outcomes. Results showed substantial continuity in the antecedents of adolescent and young-adult smoking but important discontinuities as well. Beliefs in the negative social consequences of smoking and beliefs about academic success and independence were important to adolescent but not to adult smoking. Conversely, beliefs in the negative health consequences of smoking were more important to adult smoking than to adolescent smoking. Results also showed an appreciable amount of smoking onset after the high school years, as well as an appreciable amount of adolescent smoking that did not persist into young adulthood. Antecedents of late-onset smoking and of nonpersistent smoking are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-418
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Young Adult
Smoking
Psychology
Aptitude
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

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Four pathways to young-adult smoking status : adolescent social-psychological antecedents in a midwestern community sample. / Chassin, Laurie; Presson, Clark; Sherman, S. J.; Edwards, D. A.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 6, 1991, p. 409-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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