Formation of stable dopant interstitials during ion implantation of silicon

S. J. Pennycook, Robert Culbertson, J. Narayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High concentrations of self-interstitials are trapped by dopant atoms during ion implantation into Si. For group V dopants, these complexes are sufficiently stable to survive solid-phase-epitaxial (SPE) growth but break up on subsequent thermal processing and cause a transient-enhanced diffusion. Dopant diffusion coefficients are enhanced by up to five orders of magnitude over tracer values and are characterized by an activation energy of approximately one half of the tracer values. In the case of group III dopants, any complexes formed during implantation do not survive SPE growth but a second source of self-interstitials becomes significant and leads to similar transient effects. This is the damaged layer underlying the original amorphous/crystalline interface. These observations provide direct evidence for long-range self-interstitial migration in Si, and we believe these are the first observations of the interstitialcy diffusion mechanism with no vacancy contribution. We propose that the complexes are simply interstitial dopant atoms (in a split (100) interstitialcy configuration) that are particularly stable in the case of group V dopants. As they decay self-interstitials are released and cause the transient-enhanced diffusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-492
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Materials Research
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Silicon
Ion implantation
ion implantation
interstitials
Doping (additives)
silicon
tracers
solid phases
Epitaxial growth
causes
Atoms
atoms
implantation
diffusion coefficient
Vacancies
activation energy
Activation energy
Crystalline materials
decay
configurations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Formation of stable dopant interstitials during ion implantation of silicon. / Pennycook, S. J.; Culbertson, Robert; Narayan, J.

In: Journal of Materials Research, Vol. 1, No. 3, 1986, p. 476-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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