Foreign-area expertise in U.S. Geography

An assessment of capacity based on foreign-area dissertations, 1977-1991

Billie Turner, Varlyguin Dmitry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interpretations of a decline in foreign-area specialization have raised concerns about the capacity of geography in the United States to serve the expected increase in demands for foreign-area expertise. An assessment of foreign-area dissertations awarded by U.S. geography programs over a 15-year period (1977-1991) fails to support the concerns raised. No significant declines, if any at all, are found for early career interest and research in foreign areas. Several caveats are warranted, however. Geography has lost three doctoral programs with strong foreign-area dissertation records for the period in question. Also, non-U.S. citizens, many of whom do not remain in the United States after completion of their doctorate work, account for a significant proportion of foreign-area dissertations. Various questions that must be addressed to analyze the capacity question more broadly are identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)308-314
Number of pages7
JournalProfessional Geographer
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

earning a doctorate
expertise
geography
specialization
career
citizen
interpretation
programme

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Foreign-area expertise in U.S. Geography : An assessment of capacity based on foreign-area dissertations, 1977-1991. / Turner, Billie; Dmitry, Varlyguin.

In: Professional Geographer, Vol. 47, No. 3, 1995, p. 308-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{44a242929cd7477a8df5681da658d888,
title = "Foreign-area expertise in U.S. Geography: An assessment of capacity based on foreign-area dissertations, 1977-1991",
abstract = "Interpretations of a decline in foreign-area specialization have raised concerns about the capacity of geography in the United States to serve the expected increase in demands for foreign-area expertise. An assessment of foreign-area dissertations awarded by U.S. geography programs over a 15-year period (1977-1991) fails to support the concerns raised. No significant declines, if any at all, are found for early career interest and research in foreign areas. Several caveats are warranted, however. Geography has lost three doctoral programs with strong foreign-area dissertation records for the period in question. Also, non-U.S. citizens, many of whom do not remain in the United States after completion of their doctorate work, account for a significant proportion of foreign-area dissertations. Various questions that must be addressed to analyze the capacity question more broadly are identified.",
author = "Billie Turner and Varlyguin Dmitry",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1111/j.0033-0124.1995.308_t.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "308--314",
journal = "Professional Geographer",
issn = "0033-0124",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Foreign-area expertise in U.S. Geography

T2 - An assessment of capacity based on foreign-area dissertations, 1977-1991

AU - Turner, Billie

AU - Dmitry, Varlyguin

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Interpretations of a decline in foreign-area specialization have raised concerns about the capacity of geography in the United States to serve the expected increase in demands for foreign-area expertise. An assessment of foreign-area dissertations awarded by U.S. geography programs over a 15-year period (1977-1991) fails to support the concerns raised. No significant declines, if any at all, are found for early career interest and research in foreign areas. Several caveats are warranted, however. Geography has lost three doctoral programs with strong foreign-area dissertation records for the period in question. Also, non-U.S. citizens, many of whom do not remain in the United States after completion of their doctorate work, account for a significant proportion of foreign-area dissertations. Various questions that must be addressed to analyze the capacity question more broadly are identified.

AB - Interpretations of a decline in foreign-area specialization have raised concerns about the capacity of geography in the United States to serve the expected increase in demands for foreign-area expertise. An assessment of foreign-area dissertations awarded by U.S. geography programs over a 15-year period (1977-1991) fails to support the concerns raised. No significant declines, if any at all, are found for early career interest and research in foreign areas. Several caveats are warranted, however. Geography has lost three doctoral programs with strong foreign-area dissertation records for the period in question. Also, non-U.S. citizens, many of whom do not remain in the United States after completion of their doctorate work, account for a significant proportion of foreign-area dissertations. Various questions that must be addressed to analyze the capacity question more broadly are identified.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0008997782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0008997782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.0033-0124.1995.308_t.x

DO - 10.1111/j.0033-0124.1995.308_t.x

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 308

EP - 314

JO - Professional Geographer

JF - Professional Geographer

SN - 0033-0124

IS - 3

ER -