For whom does deterrence affect behavior? Identifying key individual differences

Adam Fine, Benjamin Van Rooij

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Deterrence threats are essential mechanisms for affecting behavior, yet they are often ineffective. The literature is beginning to consider individual differences underlying differential susceptibility to deterrence. The present study sampled 223 adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk and used an experimental cheating paradigm to examine the role of 3 individual differences, including morality, self-control, and rule orientation, underlying differential susceptibility to deterrence. The results indicate that deterrence threats may be more influential for people who have low moral disengagement, who possess more self-control, or who are more rule oriented. These findings indicate that important individual differences underlie susceptibility to deterrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-360
Number of pages7
JournalLaw and Human Behavior
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

deterrence
Individuality
self-control
threat
Turk
disengagement
morality
Deterrence
Individual Differences
paradigm
Self-Control
Susceptibility
Threat
Self-control

Keywords

  • Deterrence
  • Moral disengagement
  • Rule orientation
  • Self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Law

Cite this

For whom does deterrence affect behavior? Identifying key individual differences. / Fine, Adam; Van Rooij, Benjamin.

In: Law and Human Behavior, Vol. 41, No. 4, 08.2017, p. 354-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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