Abstract

Digital technologies have transformed both the historical record and the historical profession. This Focus section examines how computational methods have influenced, and will influence, the history of science. The essays discuss the new types of questions and narratives that computational methods enable and the need for better data management in the history and philosophy of science (HPS) community. They showcase various methodological approaches, including textual and network analyses, and they place the computational turn in historiographical and societal context. Rather than surrendering to either technophilia or technophobia, the essays articulate both the benefits and the drawbacks of computational HPS. They agree that the future of the field depends on the successful integration of technological developments, social practices, and infrastructural support and that historians of science must learn to embrace collaboration both within and beyond disciplinary boundaries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-501
Number of pages5
JournalISIS
Volume110
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

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history
technological development
data management
historical record
science
Computational
History of Science
Philosophy of Science
method
need
Data Management
Disciplinary Boundaries
Showcase
Social Practice
Historians of Science
Digital Technology
Historical Records
History of the Sciences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Focus : Computational history and philosophy of science. / Gibson, Abraham; Laubichler, Manfred; Maienschein, Jane.

In: ISIS, Vol. 110, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 497-501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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