Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis (FSA) detects quantitative changes in atherosclerotic plaque collagen and elastin content in vivo

Alexander Christov, Erbin Dai, Liying Liu, Haiyan Guan, Mark A. Bernards, Paul B. Cavers, David Susko, Alexandra Lucas

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

In order to assess the capacity for in vivo fluorescence spectroscopic analysis of arterial collagen and elastin, fluorescence emission intensity (FEI) was recorded from rabbit aorta after angioplasty and stent implant, and correlated with extracted elastin and collagen content. FEI from saline treated rabbits after stent implant was higher (p<0.05) between 485 and 500 nm than after anti-inflammatory treatment. FEI was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after implantation of shorter stents at 476-500 nm. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated an excellent correlation between FEI and elastin and HPLC-measured collagen content at 486-500 nm (adj. R2 values > 0.931) and 476-480 nm (adj. R2 values up to 0.950 for selected amino acids) respectively. Conclusions: FEI recorded in vivo from arterial intimal surface, can be successfully used for quantitative assessment of compositional changes in connective tissue. Stent implant can induce changes in intimal arterial structure at discrete sites distant from the stent implant site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-88
Number of pages12
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume4613
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes
EventOptical Biopsy IV - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 21 2002Jan 23 2002

Keywords

  • Arteries
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Collagen
  • Elastin
  • Fluorescence
  • Optical analysis
  • Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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