Fluctuation microscopy: A technique for revealing atomic correlations in structurally noisy (disordered) materials

Michael Treacy, J. M. Gibson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Fluctuation microscopy is a hybrid diffraction-imaging technique that yields information about higher-order correlations between structural units in materials. It has been shown to be well suited for detecting medium range order in atomic positions in amorphous materials. This article presents a review of fluctuation microscopy as employed in a transmission electron microscope for the study of amorphous tetrahedral semiconductors. Possible extensions of the technique to other radiations such as x-rays, and for other structurally noisy materials such as polymers and starches, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsM.B. Weissman, N.E. Israeloff, A.S. Kogan
Pages48-60
Number of pages13
Volume5112
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes
EventNoise as a Tool for Studying Materials - Santa Fe, NM, United States
Duration: Jun 2 2003Jun 4 2003

Other

OtherNoise as a Tool for Studying Materials
CountryUnited States
CitySanta Fe, NM
Period6/2/036/4/03

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Treacy, M., & Gibson, J. M. (2003). Fluctuation microscopy: A technique for revealing atomic correlations in structurally noisy (disordered) materials. In M. B. Weissman, N. E. Israeloff, & A. S. Kogan (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 5112, pp. 48-60) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.497805