Flooding in vivo as research tool and treatment method for phobias: A preliminary report

George Curtis, Randolph Nesse, Martin Buxton, Jesse Wright, David Lippman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Flooding in vivo is a rapid, safe, simple, and effective method for treating phobias. Since it is specifically tied to a defined stimulus situation and can be turned on and off at will, it also lends itself to experimental investigation of a number of clinically significant problems. Among these are the psychology, physiology, and pharmacology of anxiety and therapeutic change and the behavior of therapists and patients during therapy. Among the early substantive findings with the technique are that cortisol is not necessarily secreted during anxiety, and that phobias do not "protect" against other, possibly more serious disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-160
Number of pages8
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Phobic Disorders
Anxiety
Research
Hydrocortisone
Pharmacology
Psychology
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Flooding in vivo as research tool and treatment method for phobias : A preliminary report. / Curtis, George; Nesse, Randolph; Buxton, Martin; Wright, Jesse; Lippman, David.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 17, No. 1, 1976, p. 153-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Curtis, George ; Nesse, Randolph ; Buxton, Martin ; Wright, Jesse ; Lippman, David. / Flooding in vivo as research tool and treatment method for phobias : A preliminary report. In: Comprehensive Psychiatry. 1976 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 153-160.
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