Fine resolution air quality dynamics related to socioeconomic and land use factors in the most polluted desert metropolitan in the American Southwest

Yubin Li, Soe W. Myint

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Air pollution kills approximately 4.2 million people every year. As air pollution varies significantly in different urban areas, the assessment of urban emissions is key to taking appropriate actions and formulating policies for sustainable built environments and to promote the wellbeing of people. The overarching goal of this study was to generate fine resolution aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Landsat imagery and examine both the socioeconomic inequalities of air pollution exposure and the air quality variation related to different land-use categories. This study has focused on a period of unusual population growth, 2000–2010, in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. It was found that socioeconomic factors, vegetation indexes, and land use land cover types are all strong predictors of AOD, and the negative coefficients of socioeconomic values reveal insight into the social inequality of air pollution exposure. Results suggest that the government regulation on air pollution during the study period helped to improve air quality. Meanwhile, planting vegetation to mitigate air pollution should be carefully examined in order to find the right vegetation species and spatial configuration of vegetation cover in urban settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number147713
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume788
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 20 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • AOD
  • Air pollution
  • Lands use and land cover types
  • Landsat
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

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