Finding Fairness in America's Cities? The Search for Environmental Equity in Everyday Life

Melinda Laituri, Andrew Kirby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article argues that any consideration of green justice cannot be limited solely to wilderness areas; it must include natural resources as they are manifested in urban areas. We discuss the ways in which residents' images of the natural world are shaped by various institutional forces, including corporations and government of all types. We link up these insights to the growing recognition that there exists an inequitable distribution of natural resources within American cities, a phenomenon identified by residents as “environmental racism”. We argue that in order to analyze this situation, it is necessary to generate new analytical tools, and an Environmental Equity Assessment (EEA) is presented. The use of the EEA is presented in a brief case study of Tucson, Arizona. 1994 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-139
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social Issues
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

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fairness
everyday life
natural resources
equity
resident
social issue
racism
corporation
urban area
justice
Society

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Finding Fairness in America's Cities? The Search for Environmental Equity in Everyday Life. / Laituri, Melinda; Kirby, Andrew.

In: Journal of Social Issues, Vol. 50, No. 3, 1994, p. 121-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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