Filling the Void: Spiritual Development Among Adolescents of the Affluent

Samuel H. Barkin, Lisa Miller, Suniya Luthar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Building on both the spiritual development and affluent youth literature, the current study explores spiritual development and health outcomes in a sample of upper-middle-class youth. Exploratory analyses indicate long-term stability in religiosity and spirituality from late adolescence (mean age 18) well into emerging adulthood (mean age 24); specifically, a strong personal relationship with a Higher Power, that carries into the broader arena of life, appears to be the primary source of spiritual life in adolescence that transitions into young adulthood. Moreover, cross-sectional associations at age 24 suggest spiritual development may have important implications for increased mental health and life satisfaction, as well as decreased antisocial behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)844-861
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Adolescent Development
Literature
Spirituality
Mental Health
Spiritual Development
Voids
Health
Adolescence

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Affluent youth
  • Development
  • Emerging adults
  • Religiosity
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Filling the Void : Spiritual Development Among Adolescents of the Affluent. / Barkin, Samuel H.; Miller, Lisa; Luthar, Suniya.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 54, No. 3, 01.06.2015, p. 844-861.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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