Fifteen-year follow-up of a randomized trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families: Effects on mental health and substance use outcomes in young adulthood

Sharlene Wolchik, Irwin Sandler, Jenn-Yun Tein, Nicole E. Mahrer, Roger E. Millsap, Emily Winslow, Clorinda Vélez, Michele M. Porter, Linda Luecken, Amanda Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This 15-year follow-up assessed the effects of a preventive intervention for divorced families, the New Beginnings Program (NBP), versus a literature control condition (LC). Method: Mothers and their 9- to 12-year-olds (N = 240 families) participated in the trial. Young adults (YAs) reported on their mental health and substance-related disorders, mental health and substance use problems, and substance use. Mothers reported on YA's mental health and substance use problems. Disorders were assessed over the past 9 years (since previous follow-up) and 15 years (since program entry). Alcohol and marijuana use, other substance use and polydrug use, and mental health problems and substance use problems were assessed over the past month, past year, and past 6 months, respectively. Results: YAs in NBP had a lower incidence of internalizing disorders in the past 9 years (7.55% vs. 24.4%; odds ratio [OR] =.26) and 15 years (15.52% vs. 34.62%; OR =.34) and had a slower rate of onset of internalizing symptoms associated with disorder in the past 9 years (hazard ratio [HR] =.28) and 15 years (HR =.46). NBP males had a lower number of substance-related disorders in the past 9 years (d = 0.40), less polydrug (d = 0.55) and other drug use (d = 0.61) in the past year, and fewer substance use problems (d = 0.50) in the past 6 months than LC males. NBP females used more alcohol in the past month (d = 0.44) than LC females. Conclusions: NBP reduced the incidence of internalizing disorders for females and males and substance-related disorders and substance use for males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)660-673
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Divorce
Mental Health
Substance-Related Disorders
Young Adult
Odds Ratio
Alcohols
Mothers
Incidence
Cannabis
Adulthood
Substance Use
Pharmaceutical Preparations
New Beginning

Keywords

  • divorce
  • mental health
  • prevention
  • substance use
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{403741e44b2545d0baa7a70eed9be525,
title = "Fifteen-year follow-up of a randomized trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families: Effects on mental health and substance use outcomes in young adulthood",
abstract = "Objective: This 15-year follow-up assessed the effects of a preventive intervention for divorced families, the New Beginnings Program (NBP), versus a literature control condition (LC). Method: Mothers and their 9- to 12-year-olds (N = 240 families) participated in the trial. Young adults (YAs) reported on their mental health and substance-related disorders, mental health and substance use problems, and substance use. Mothers reported on YA's mental health and substance use problems. Disorders were assessed over the past 9 years (since previous follow-up) and 15 years (since program entry). Alcohol and marijuana use, other substance use and polydrug use, and mental health problems and substance use problems were assessed over the past month, past year, and past 6 months, respectively. Results: YAs in NBP had a lower incidence of internalizing disorders in the past 9 years (7.55{\%} vs. 24.4{\%}; odds ratio [OR] =.26) and 15 years (15.52{\%} vs. 34.62{\%}; OR =.34) and had a slower rate of onset of internalizing symptoms associated with disorder in the past 9 years (hazard ratio [HR] =.28) and 15 years (HR =.46). NBP males had a lower number of substance-related disorders in the past 9 years (d = 0.40), less polydrug (d = 0.55) and other drug use (d = 0.61) in the past year, and fewer substance use problems (d = 0.50) in the past 6 months than LC males. NBP females used more alcohol in the past month (d = 0.44) than LC females. Conclusions: NBP reduced the incidence of internalizing disorders for females and males and substance-related disorders and substance use for males.",
keywords = "divorce, mental health, prevention, substance use, young adults",
author = "Sharlene Wolchik and Irwin Sandler and Jenn-Yun Tein and Mahrer, {Nicole E.} and Millsap, {Roger E.} and Emily Winslow and Clorinda V{\'e}lez and Porter, {Michele M.} and Linda Luecken and Amanda Reed",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1037/a0033235",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "81",
pages = "660--673",
journal = "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Fifteen-year follow-up of a randomized trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families

T2 - Effects on mental health and substance use outcomes in young adulthood

AU - Wolchik, Sharlene

AU - Sandler, Irwin

AU - Tein, Jenn-Yun

AU - Mahrer, Nicole E.

AU - Millsap, Roger E.

AU - Winslow, Emily

AU - Vélez, Clorinda

AU - Porter, Michele M.

AU - Luecken, Linda

AU - Reed, Amanda

PY - 2013/8

Y1 - 2013/8

N2 - Objective: This 15-year follow-up assessed the effects of a preventive intervention for divorced families, the New Beginnings Program (NBP), versus a literature control condition (LC). Method: Mothers and their 9- to 12-year-olds (N = 240 families) participated in the trial. Young adults (YAs) reported on their mental health and substance-related disorders, mental health and substance use problems, and substance use. Mothers reported on YA's mental health and substance use problems. Disorders were assessed over the past 9 years (since previous follow-up) and 15 years (since program entry). Alcohol and marijuana use, other substance use and polydrug use, and mental health problems and substance use problems were assessed over the past month, past year, and past 6 months, respectively. Results: YAs in NBP had a lower incidence of internalizing disorders in the past 9 years (7.55% vs. 24.4%; odds ratio [OR] =.26) and 15 years (15.52% vs. 34.62%; OR =.34) and had a slower rate of onset of internalizing symptoms associated with disorder in the past 9 years (hazard ratio [HR] =.28) and 15 years (HR =.46). NBP males had a lower number of substance-related disorders in the past 9 years (d = 0.40), less polydrug (d = 0.55) and other drug use (d = 0.61) in the past year, and fewer substance use problems (d = 0.50) in the past 6 months than LC males. NBP females used more alcohol in the past month (d = 0.44) than LC females. Conclusions: NBP reduced the incidence of internalizing disorders for females and males and substance-related disorders and substance use for males.

AB - Objective: This 15-year follow-up assessed the effects of a preventive intervention for divorced families, the New Beginnings Program (NBP), versus a literature control condition (LC). Method: Mothers and their 9- to 12-year-olds (N = 240 families) participated in the trial. Young adults (YAs) reported on their mental health and substance-related disorders, mental health and substance use problems, and substance use. Mothers reported on YA's mental health and substance use problems. Disorders were assessed over the past 9 years (since previous follow-up) and 15 years (since program entry). Alcohol and marijuana use, other substance use and polydrug use, and mental health problems and substance use problems were assessed over the past month, past year, and past 6 months, respectively. Results: YAs in NBP had a lower incidence of internalizing disorders in the past 9 years (7.55% vs. 24.4%; odds ratio [OR] =.26) and 15 years (15.52% vs. 34.62%; OR =.34) and had a slower rate of onset of internalizing symptoms associated with disorder in the past 9 years (hazard ratio [HR] =.28) and 15 years (HR =.46). NBP males had a lower number of substance-related disorders in the past 9 years (d = 0.40), less polydrug (d = 0.55) and other drug use (d = 0.61) in the past year, and fewer substance use problems (d = 0.50) in the past 6 months than LC males. NBP females used more alcohol in the past month (d = 0.44) than LC females. Conclusions: NBP reduced the incidence of internalizing disorders for females and males and substance-related disorders and substance use for males.

KW - divorce

KW - mental health

KW - prevention

KW - substance use

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