Feeling like part of a team: Perceived parenting agreement among first-time parents

Brian P. Don, Susanne N. Biehle, Kristin Mickelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior research has established the importance of co-parenting for child outcomes, yet little is known about how co-parenting influences parents themselves. The current study expands on the prior literature by examining an important aspect of co-parenting, perceived parenting agreement, and exploring the longitudinal association of perceived parenting agreement with new parents' depression, positive affect, and relationship satisfaction during the transition to parenthood. Using a dyadic approach, results indicated there were significant actor effects of parenting agreement on both mothers' and fathers' mental health outcomes, such that greater agreement predicted better subsequent mental health. Perceived parenting agreement was also significantly associated with subsequent relationship satisfaction for mothers only, such that greater perceived agreement by both the mother (actor effect) and the father (partner effect) predicted greater subsequent maternal relationship satisfaction. Our results suggest perceptions of parenting agreement are important for new parents' mental health and maternal relationship satisfaction during the transition to parenthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1121-1137
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Parenting
Emotions
parents
Parents
Health
mental health
parenthood
Mothers
father
Mental Health
Fathers
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • Coparenting
  • parenting agreement
  • relationship satisfaction
  • transition to parenthood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Feeling like part of a team : Perceived parenting agreement among first-time parents. / Don, Brian P.; Biehle, Susanne N.; Mickelson, Kristin.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 30, No. 8, 12.2013, p. 1121-1137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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