Feedback, subjective time estimates, and user satisfaction

Russell Branaghan, Christopher A. Sanchez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This experiment investigates the effects of three types of feedback, static, dynamic and cumulative progress, designed to keep the user apprised while a computer completes a transaction. Using a simulated online movie store, participants chose movies for various audiences and then were required to wait 15 or 30 seconds for the computer to process their order. Participants perceived the transactions using the dynamic feedback indicators and cumulative progress bars to be more reasonable than transactions using the static feedback display, even though the transaction times were identical. However, there was no difference in the perception of processing time reasonableness between the dynamic display and the cumulative progress indicator. Despite this, cumulative progress bars were preferred to both dynamic and static feedback indicators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
Pages1350-1353
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2008Sep 26 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period9/22/089/26/08

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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  • Cite this

    Branaghan, R., & Sanchez, C. A. (2008). Feedback, subjective time estimates, and user satisfaction. In 52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 (pp. 1350-1353). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2).