Federal job training programs and employment outcomes: Effects by sex and race of participants

Sharon L. Harlan, Edward J. Hackett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the extent to which the program activity assignments of participants in federal job training programs affect their future employment prospects. We analyze the effects of three types of programs-classroom training, on-the-job training, and work experience-on the post-program employment outcomes of black and white women and men. The data are from the Continuous Longitudinal Manpower Survey of fiscal 1976 participants in the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA). Logistic regression and event history analysis are used to assess the likelihood of immediate employment upon leaving CETA and the rates at which participants enter and leave their first post-program spells of employment and nonemployment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-265
Number of pages31
JournalPopulation Research and Policy Review
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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