Family Support and Family Negativity as Mediators of the Relation between Acculturation and Postpartum Weight in Low-Income Mexican-Origin Women

Shannon L. Jewell, Kirsten Letham-Hamlett, Mariam Hanna Ibrahim, Linda Luecken, David Mackinnon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Obesity presents a significant health concern among low-income, ethnic minority women of childbearing age. Purpose: The study investigated the influence of maternal acculturation, family negativity, and family support on postpartum weight loss among low-income Mexican-origin women. Methods: Low-income Mexican-origin women (N=322; 14% born in the U.S.) were recruited from a prenatal clinic in an urban area of the Southwest U.S. Acculturation was assessed during a prenatal home visit (26–38 weeks gestation), and post-birth family support and general family negativity were assessed at 6 weeks postpartum. Objective maternal weight measures were obtained at five time points across the first postpartum year. Results: Higher acculturation predicted higher family support and family negativity. Higher family support predicted decreasing weight across the first postpartum year, and higher family negativity predicted higher weight at 6 weeks postpartum and increasing weight across the first postpartum year. In combination, family negativity and support mediated the impact of acculturation on postpartum weight gain. Conclusions: Cultural and family-related factors play a significant role in postpartum weight gain and loss for low-income Mexican-origin women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 3 2017

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Postpartum Period
Weights and Measures
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Southwestern United States
Mothers
House Calls
Obesity
Parturition
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Family
  • Hispanic
  • Postpartum
  • Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Family Support and Family Negativity as Mediators of the Relation between Acculturation and Postpartum Weight in Low-Income Mexican-Origin Women. / Jewell, Shannon L.; Letham-Hamlett, Kirsten; Hanna Ibrahim, Mariam; Luecken, Linda; Mackinnon, David.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 03.05.2017, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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