Family Structure, Substance Use, and Child Protective Services Involvement: Exploring Child Outcomes and Services

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using data from the National Survey on Child and Adolescent Well-Being (N = 5,501), this study explored caregiver substance use, family structure, and child well-being. Findings demonstrated that children of single mothers who use substances had higher externalized behavior problems than children of mothers with secondary caregivers in the home and who did not use substances. Children demonstrated more positive behavior and social skills in families without substance use. Single mothers with substance use accessed the most mental and behavioral health services and child welfare casework services compared to mothers who had available secondary caregivers and who did not use substances. Overall, this study demonstrated links among family structure, substance use, and child protective services involvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-49
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

family structure
Child Welfare
Mothers
Caregivers
caregiver
Mental Health Services
Child Behavior
casework
child well-being
child welfare
health service
well-being
Child Protective Services
adolescent

Keywords

  • child protective services (CPS)
  • child welfare
  • secondary caregivers
  • single mothers
  • social services
  • substance use and abuse
  • use of services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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