Family First? The Costs and Benefits of Family Centrality for Adolescents with High-Conflict Families

Cynthia X. Yuen, Andrew J. Fuligni, Nancy Gonzales, Eva H. Telzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Youth who do not identify with or value their families (i.e., low family centrality) are considered to be at risk for maladjustment. However, the current study investigated whether low family centrality may be adaptive in negative family contexts (i.e., high family conflict) because youth’s self-worth should be less tied to the quality of their family relationships. Multilevel models using daily diaries and latent variable interactions using longitudinal questionnaires indicated that, among a sample of 428 Mexican American adolescents (49.8% male, Mage = 15.02 years), lower family centrality was generally detrimental to youth’s well-being. However, for youth in adverse family environments, low family centrality ceased to function as a risk factor. The present findings suggest that family centrality values play a more nuanced role in youth well-being than previously believed, such that low family centrality may be an adaptive response to significant family challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 13 2017

Fingerprint

Family Conflict
Cost-Benefit Analysis
adolescent
costs
well-being
Family Relations
Values

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Family conflict
  • Family relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Family First? The Costs and Benefits of Family Centrality for Adolescents with High-Conflict Families. / Yuen, Cynthia X.; Fuligni, Andrew J.; Gonzales, Nancy; Telzer, Eva H.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 13.05.2017, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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